Sky Pilot: raincoaster?

cessna 182

cessna 182

Yes. You’d be surprised, but I’m actually a more accomplished aerobatic pilot than the guy bringing you in to La Guardia. And The Sister is twice as accomplished.

I’m stealing these and copy/pasting them from a Gawker post about junior pilots, racing around the world to beat the Guinness book and dying in the process. Enough.

Really.

Enough.

I was a child pilot and I don’t have any issue with teaching kids to fly, but when you add the competitive aspect, and the extreme range of conditions mentioned above, you have a recipe for disaster. These competition kids die. They DIE in disproportionate numbers. Because of a fucking deadline, because of ambitious parents, because they are pushed too far.

Rebel Rebel

Tell it to this guy.

GregorMendel

“I was a child pilot.” Do tell!

raincoaster

I think I’ve told it a few times before, but what the hell.

My dad was a natural-born aviator who could make clunky, run of the mill planes do anything he wanted. Unfortunately for him, he did not come from the class who sent their sons to university, so he was a Sergeant, not an officer. As a non-officer, he wasn’t allowed to be a pilot, although he would occasionally give flying lessons to those who were, and wanted to try something different.

Most every weekend he’d take us up in a rented Cessna, my sister and me, and do aerobatic manoeuvres these planes were never meant for. They’re good planes, though, and he was an excellent pilot, so it was fine. Eventually he taught us. My sister could do an eight point barrel roll by the time she turned ten. I wasn’t that good, and only managed a four.

But we didn’t compete, we never felt pushed, and if we’d rather have stayed on teh ground that would have been okay with my father. It would have saved him saying (as he did every time we landed) “Don’t tell your mother.”

GregorMendel
Absolutely wonderful! Thanks for sharing even though you’ve done it before. I had no idea you had such an adventurous childhood. Dang.

raincoaster

Thanks. Actually, till I became a teen and started comparing myself to my peers, I’d no idea what we’d been doing was cool at all. Since high school, the only place it’s been cool is here, in the Gawker comment section.

PS still jelly my sister was the better pilot. We both went on to completely unrelated careers, her to high-level academic administration, me to (spam alert) The Cryptosphere.

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Report from HOPE X: Surveillance, Snowden, Stratfor and Surprises

raincoaster:

Well, this was ironic. We sent a correspondent to cover the Hackers on Planet Earth conference. Guess what happened to him? Well, read on…

Originally posted on The Cryptosphere:

HOPE X, which took place in New York this past weekend, is one of the premiere events of the hacker calendar. The Cryptosphere correspondent Douglas Lucas was there, presenting on a panel, schmoozing over sushi, sneaking into the press room, and … but that would be telling!

Thursday

On my Thursday flight to the tenth Hackers on Planet Earth convention, half-asleep and writing my part for the Project PM panel, I wondered what this article—which I’m writing on the plane back—would report. Figured the weekend would be a thorny mix of “total surveillance NSA surveillance is a dire emergency wracking ruin on humanity RIGHT NOW” and passing out business cards.

The plane trip back, by the way, is enlivened by an email from an editor, asking why my latest article was doing so well on social media. Turned out WikiLeaks had tweeted the link. So, that was…

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Technological Imperialism: Nastaliq vs Google and Apple

raincoaster:

Our very first Op/Ed from author and poet Ali Eteraz on the casual censorship of Google and Apple vs language and identity

Originally posted on The Cryptosphere:

We are very happy to inaugurate our Opinion column with this piece by Ali Eteraz on the casual censorship of Big Technology, and its effect on language and identity.

I’m a Bay Area based writer who has gotten fed up with the disregard that Google and Apple have shown to the languages of hundreds of millions of people, especially Persian, Punjabi, and Urdu. That is at least 200 million people, if not more.

Basically, Apple & Google both treat these languages as “Arabic.” Even though Urdu has twelve more letters than Arabic, Apple thinks that Urdu speakers can use the Arabic keyboard.

Imagine your foreign phone maker expecting you to write without a letter as ubiquitous as E.

That’s what Apple demands from Urdu and Punjabi speakers. As for Google, it’s imposing an Arabic Naskh Script on these languages, which have traditionally been written in a cursive cascading script called…

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So, this happened

raincoaster:

Andrew WK is a fan of The Cryptosphere. Well, of course he is. He has taste!

Originally posted on The Cryptosphere:

The drumroll at the end of the internet

The drumroll at the end of the internet

Featured image via Mashable

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Spreaker of the House: introducing The Cryptosphere on AnonUKRadio

The Cryptosphere

The Cryptosphere

I’m a bit behind on my publicity stunting for my new news site TheCryptosphere, but here’s some! I know!!! Aren’t you excited?

Last week, which is to say July 6, 2014, I appeared as a guest on Topman‘s AnonUK radio show, which (particularly since Lorax got v&) is one of the most popular Anonymous podcasts in the world. Here’s their YouTube introduction to the concept of Anonymous itself:

And here is the podcast, featuring moi, Sue Crabtree of FreeAnonsd00minator, and more: